What is the Japanese art of regenerative living?

In exploring mountain villages and seaside towns, speaking with grandmas, fermenters, geologists, and artisans up and down the Japanese archipelago, I have had the great privilege of being in the company of deep-seated wisdom.

These wisdoms have defined my foundation. Grounding me to me in a way that I have never experienced before. I now know how to better eat for my unique body to feel my happiest. I now know how to better care for my emotions by connecting them to the rhythm of the natural world. I now know how to better nurture my relationships with my family and friends so we can learn and lean and love with pleasure.

The Japanese art of regenerative living is derived from koyomi-advised skills and practices of ishokujyu.

koyomi: The traditional Japanese microseasonal calendar tells the story of the people and rituals, skies and earth, seas and mountains, flora and fauna that create a single year. The year consists of the four seasons, twenty-four sub-seasons, and seventy-two microseasons. It is through this story that we better understand our place in the natural world and our great privilege in being a part of it.

ishokujyu: The word that means “to live” or “to create living” is a mashup of three separate words: clothing, food, home. As it is through these three lenses that we express, and experience the world. Clothing are the fibers that swaddle you and help you to express yourself to the world, food are the ingredients that unite you with the earth and nourish your soul, and home are the materials that protect you from harsh weather and create a comforting place to rest.

All to say that the Japanese art of regenerative living are a set of tools that have been derived from the relationship between the traditional microseasonal calendar and the fundamental pillars of Japanese living.

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The Japanese art of regenerative living.
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Momoko Nakamura

Momoko Nakamura

Cultural conservationist and storyteller, exploring the Japanese art of regenerative living: https://momokonakamura.com